Happy family: Rhiana Moore, third from right, dreamed of a future travelling around the world. She caught the travel bug while taking trips with her extended family. Here, during a recent cruise, she is pictured with, from left to right, her mother, Julieann; her grandmother, Brenda Wainwright; her sister, Khara; her cousin, Mickai Wainwright; and her aunt, Andrea Wainwright. *Photo supplied
Happy family: Rhiana Moore, third from right, dreamed of a future travelling around the world. She caught the travel bug while taking trips with her extended family. Here, during a recent cruise, she is pictured with, from left to right, her mother, Julieann; her grandmother, Brenda Wainwright; her sister, Khara; her cousin, Mickai Wainwright; and her aunt, Andrea Wainwright. *Photo supplied
As a bright and conscientious honours student, Rhiana Moore had a shining future ahead. She dreamed of a life of travel and of high-flying success.

Next year she planned to visit universities to decide where she would study once she left school. And one day, she told her mother, she would live in New York.

Those dreams have been cut cruelly short after Rhiana was murdered; her body dumped and washed up at Blue Hole.

Her mother, Julieann, still reeling from the shock, has managed to share her memories of her daughter publicly for the first time. She says that together with Rhiana's younger sister, 10-year-old Khara, mother and daughters were "a team."

"I didn't go anywhere without my two girls," Mrs. Moore says. "The three of us were more than family - we were so close. Now it feels like a piece of me has gone. A part of us, of what we had built, has gone. We were a team and I still can't believe she won't be part of that anymore.

"Khara would get home from school and go straight to her sister's room and lie on the bed. They adored one another. They would gossip, reminisce and just hang out. To see the two of them together, that was one of my biggest joys."

The family spent Bermuda Day watching the parade. The two girls laughed together and waved to friends.

"That's just what we were like," Mrs. Moore says. "It was so natural. We were never apart; we were a team. Rhiana was my gem, she was just my gem. She was more than a daughter: she was a friend."

Rhiana, a CedarBridge S1 student, was heavily involved in her church: the Radnor Road Christian Fellowship in Shelly Bay. She helped out with groups of younger children and was at the church youth group last Friday night - the night before her body was discovered.

"The church meant a lot to her," her mother says. "You never had to tell her to get up on Sunday. She would be the one saying to me: 'Come on mom, it's nearly 10 o'clock.' That's how she was: enthused. It was the same with school: you never had to tell her to get up or do her work. She knew what she wanted and was prepared to work for it.

"She did so well in school. She was looking forward to visiting universities next year. She always said she would work for XL or ACE, but work for their branch offices so that she could travel. She wanted to be somebody; she was following her dreams."

When she wasn't too busy with schoolwork, Rhiana spent part of her Saturdays packing groceries at the local store. "The cellphone was her responsibility, so she always wanted to make some money for that. She was prepared to work hard to get something out of life."

"I liked to do something nice for her," Mrs. Moore said. "Especially when she did well at school. She was in the top 50 at school and so I paid her phone bill that month. And I arranged trips: Rhiana loved to travel. She loved clothes, and she loved to draw, but I'd say it was travel she loved most. She knew she was going to travel when she got older: she dreamed of New York: the bright lights, the fashion."

The family had booked their next trip in August. Mrs. Moore, who works for Butterfield Bank, still finds it difficult to comprehend that Rhiana won't be joining them. "We're going..." she begins, before correcting herself to "We were going..."

Asked about her favourite memory of her daughter, Mrs. Moore says: "Seeing her do well in school. Or her smile, simply her smile. My special memory, that I will have forever, is seeing my child smile."